tomtac: (Default)
tomtac ([personal profile] tomtac) wrote2015-10-17 08:49 pm

"Natural explanations". And the other kind.

This kind of thing is rocking neat. The Kepler Space Telescope keeps looking at more than 150,000 stars at once, and there are plenty that look like there is "a mess of matter circling it" and that "would be expected if the star is young". And there are others without that crowdedness, stars that are more mature.

But then there is this one star ...

"The Most Mysterious Star in Our Galaxy" article in The Atlantic magazine

I like the part in which the most "natural explanation" is that another star passed by it rather recently, and the gravitational pull sucked in a lot of comets. That would be plenty interesting in itself, worth studying.

But other people are more speculative, with a “swarm of megastructures” as a scenario.

An astronomer named Jason Wright says "Aliens should always be the very last hypothesis you consider, but this looked like something you would expect an alien civilization to build.”

If all goes well, they say, a large radio telescope will have time scheduled, some time around January, to take a good sampling of whatever radio waves can be coming from the star. If the data looks right, another look may be taken next fall or sooner.